STATE OF THE NATION JULY 2013



More than 100 days into the UHURUTO regime and this is a snapshot  of our situation

A.      POLITICALLY
-          We have a president who rode on ICC hinged impunity to state house. Consequently, he is doing every good gimmick to win Kenyans. However, in the PR gimmicks lies the problem, what will happen once the president is tired of all these PR shenanigans e.g. wearing same shirts with deputy

-          We have a deputy president whose cards are slowly dwindling. He now remains with only one ace Card i.e. the Pastoralist Community. That is what it has been all about i.e. the many appointments from the wider pastoralist community. However, a recent court ruling only goes to show that other land cases may be resurrected any time. Remember, there was the ngong forest land saga of which he was cleared because the prosecution witnesses declined to testify? I am afraid that these cases and recent lavish trips splashed in the media is a larger scheme to tame this conniving Kenyan.

-          There is no political will to address the past injustices; especially irregular allocation of public land and grabbing of community land. The rhetoric is that we should accept, forgive each other and move on. This is the reason why, the Truth Justice and Reconciliation Commission's report was waste papers handed to the president.

-          Devolved governments are so far painting pictures of gloom rather than hope. It seems only corruption and plunder was devolved. It is for this reason that some county can afford to set aside 53 million for entertainment while it only requires such an amount of money to transform livelihoods for a majority in the county in a quantifiable way

B.      ECONOMY
-          When it was announced that choices have consequences, some dared the consequences. 100 days after elections and some are still asking, where are the consequences. Well, smell the coffee dear Kenyans; the most devastating consequences happen to one in a subtle way. Yes, in a subtle way, it is like the West is withdrawing its support for Kenya while our leaders continue to clamor about going east. To the East we shall go but will the East buy our coffee? Will it buy our Miraa? Will it buy our Oil? Will it generously fund KDF in Somalia? Will it support war on terrorism?

-          Teachers are on strike clamoring for higher salaries

-          Elected leaders have already secured their high salaries

-          We have moved from a bloated coalition government to a bloated two tier devolved government
-          And the government wants to slap VAT on basic commodities like UNGA. I can’t pretend to know the future but as long as the status quo is sustained at all costs, I can see a basic needs revolution in the offing

C.      SOCIALLY
-          We accepted and moved on but are we as a nation unified?
-          Kenya is more tribal than ever. The latent anger subdued by urge to accept and move on is prodded every time a public office is seen to act selfishly. Like it or not, tribe is no longer just a preferred consideration in relationships but a necessary consideration.

D.      INSTITUTIONS
Is there one institution in Kenya that Kenyans support and hold in high esteem?
-          The Supreme Court and other courts are still seen to perpetuate vested interests. Therefore, one does not take their rulings on principle given rulings are not based on principle. Questions on the likes of Vice Supreme Court president and her involvement in commissions of inquiry known for cover-up only compound scepticism

- Parliamentarians lost it completely with their clamor for higher salaries. It feels like no good has come out of parliament in the last 100 days. The vetting of state officers done by parliamentarians only cemented the idea that MPs had no will to do what they ought to do in the interest of common citizens. Such a perception is compounded by the MPs rhetoric with regard to Supremacy between national assembly and senate.
 
-          The police are expected to reform but the person of Inspector general no longer commands respect and awe. It feels like he is a lame duck and instead of performing, they are engaging in cock fights with Kavuludi. Kenyans expect the IG to work with the Kavuludi led commission in formulating policy but most crucially, Kimaiyo should be on the ground rolling out programs that restore sense in the forces.
-          The most interesting institution in Kenya is IEBC. Rather than calling it the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission, I prefer to call it the Incumbent Election Blundering Commission. The commission seems not to get it right. Case in hand, the resent clearing and later barring of Kethi Kilonzo. While it is sad to even to imagine that while we the small fish suffer voting for politicians, the likes of Kethi are not registered, the way the saga unfolded leaves IEBC more dented than respected. Why does it feel like IEBC is serving partisan interests?

E.       RELIGIOUSLY
Considering the ways of religious leaders in our beautiful country, it is safe to assume that finally there seems to be a separation between religion and the state. However, whenever you see a nation where the clergy are busy doing their thing as if oblivious of what is happening around them, such a land is kind of doomed.The true religious calling is in line with demanding for social justice in society anchored on religious principles like equality among humans

F.       EDUCATION
There are many mushrooming colleges and university colleges or are they chartered universities. Consequently, mass production of degrees and diplomas is on going. Unfortunately, there are so many papers in our briefcases but very little drops of technical skills in our keep.

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